Ann Clyde

Ann Clyde

Link to Wikipedia entry.

Obituary:  Professor Laurel Anne Clyde.    inCite v26, Nov 2005, p.12.

7 February 1946 - 18 September 2005

The international library and information community has been much saddened by the sudden death of Professor L  Anne Clyde in Reykjavik.  Anne has been a great friend and colleague of many of us in IFLA and the library and information profession.  It is an untimely loss of an outstanding library educator, a vigorous proponent for school libraries and a strong IFLA supporter.

Until her death, Anne Clyde was the 2003-07 chair of the IFLA Section of School Libraries and Resource Centres and professor in the Department of Library and Information Science at the University of Iceland, an Associate of the Australian Library and Information Association, a Fellow of CILIP and a Member of the Australian College of Educators.  In an outstanding academic career, Anne held academic positions in three Australian states, as lecturer in School Librarianship at Townsville College of Advanced Education (now part of the James Cook University of North Queensland); as lecturer in Librarianship at Charles Sturt University, Wagga Wagga; and as senior lecturer and head of the Department of Library and Information Studies at Edith Cowan University in Perth, Western Australia, with which she continued her relationship as an adjunct professor.  She has since held positions at the University of British Columbia in Canada and at the University of Iceland.

Anne has taught and researched in many other places in Australia and Iceland and beyond, including projects in North America, Europe, Latin America and Southern Africa. Her extensive list of publications includes Weblogs and Libraries (2004), An Introduction to the Internet (1994, twelfth edition 2004), Managing InfoTech in School Library Media Centers (1999), School Libraries and the Electronic Community: The Internet Connection (1997), and Computer Applications in Libraries (1993).

Although Anne's work has spanned many library fields, her contributions to school librarianship have been particularly noteworthy and valued.  Besides her leadership in the IFLA Section of School Libraries and Resource Centres, Anne has contributed enormously to the International Association of School Librarianship for which she was most recently webmaster.

At a personal level, Anne and I have known each other since the time when she was doing her PhD at James Cook University and I was a novice reference librarian.  We collaborated on a conference on Freedom of Information at that time and have since been working together in various ways, particularly of course in IFLA.

I know that I speak for many, many colleagues throughout the world in expressing both our great sadness at losing Anne and our gratitude for the ways in which she has enriched our lives.  We join with her family, friends, colleagues and students in mourning Anne and in celebrating her achievements.  We should lift a glass of good wine to her, as she would have liked us to do.

Alex Byrne, IFLA president